Rising Tide


Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
Rising Tide
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Rising Tide
Rising Tide Natural Medicine
Liam McClintock, ND, MAcOM, DHANP
Naturopathic Doctor, Master Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine,
Board Certified in Homeopathy & Acupuncture

Rising Tide

Compiled by Liam McClintock, ND, MAcOM, DHANP

Board Regulation: Three states have homeopathic licensing laws: Connecticut (1892), Arizona (1982), and Nevada (1983) -- Medical Doctors practicing homeopathy in Connecticut, and Medical or Osteopathic Doctors practicing homeopathy in Arizona or Nevada, must be licensed by the state homeopathic licensing board. Other health-care providers such as naturopathic doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, dentists, veterinarians, chiropractors, licensed acupuncturists, nurse midwives, and podiatrists may be allowed to use homeopathy within the scope of their licenses, depending on the laws of the state in which they reside.

Board Certification: There are many varied designations that homeopaths may use to distinguish their training or organizational membership. The designations in the United States that require specified hours of formal education in homeopathy, competency testing, continuing education requirements, and confer Board Certification to practice homeopathy are available to Medical and Osteopathic Doctors through the American Board of Homeotherapeutics (DHt) [or a lower level Primary Care Homeopathic Certificate (PHC) which is also available to Advanced Practice Nurses and Physician Assistants]; to Naturopathic Doctors through the Homeopathic Academy of Naturopathic Physicians (DHANP); and to all other professionals through the Council for Homeopathic Certification (CCH). Most other designations either reflect foreign education in homeopathy, certification for completion of some course in homeopathy, or registration/membership in a homeopathic organization (eg. MDH, FFHom, HMC, RSHom, DHom, RHom, et. al.).

Training: There are many training programs and courses in homeopathy in both the U.S. and abroad; however, no diploma or certificate from any school or program is recognized as a license to practice homeopathy in the U.S. Most serious homeopaths continually engage in many hours of continuing education in homeopathy each year in addition to their licensing requirements.

The Medicines: Homeopathic medicines have been regulated since the 1930’s separately from pharmaceutical drugs by a Board that governs the US Homeopathic Pharmacopea. Most homeopathic medicines are designated as over-the-counter preparations, though many pharmacies restrict the sale of higher potencies to homeopathic practitioners.

Homeopathic Practice: Classical Homeopathy is the practice of prescribing one remedy at a time in any of a number of potencies based on the entire presenting symptom picture of the patient. The method is designed to illicit a specific healing response from the patient and is closest to the scientific approach developed by the founder Samuel Hahnemann, MD. Other practices of homeopathy may include the use of a combination of remedies in low potency or selection of remedies using various non-classical methods.

Referrals: Most homeopathic practitioners are willing to collaborate with conventional doctors who refer patients to them. In many cases, the referral will be out of an HMO plan and may or may not be covered by the individual’s health insurance policy. Homeopathy is applicable in a wide variety of conditions, but is particularly well suited to complex patients who have a wide spectrum of symptoms, patients who have complicating psycho-emotional complaints, or those who are particularly sensitive to (or intolerant of) conventional pharmaceutical treatment.

Liability: Homeopathic practitioners who are licensed in some manner generally carry the appropriate liability insurance. The liability for the referring practitioner would theoretically be the same as for a referral to any other practitioner who maintains their own liability insurance. Consultation with specific professional liability insurance carriers and legal consultants could provide more accurate guidelines.

The Process: Education of a patient as to the initial reaction to remedies and the progression of symptoms is paramount to eliciting favorable compliance and patience with the process. Homeopathy seeks to reverse the progression of an illness by reversing the order in which symptoms have appeared. In most cases it is important to allow a mild increase in the initial presenting symptoms or a reappearance of old symptoms to occur as the patient improves. Generally, using homeopathy along with stabilizing conventional medications until improvement starts and then very gradually tapering off the conventional medications is the most appropriate method by which to proceed.

Resources: National Center for Homeopathy (NCH), www.homeopathic.org

North American Society of Homeopaths (NASH), www.homeopathy.org

American Institute of Homeopathy (AIH), http://www.homeopathyusa.org

Foundation for the Advancement of Innovative Medicine (FAIM), www.faim.org


Rising Tide

 









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